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    This weekend's full Blood Moon is a supermoon on Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles)

    Carol
    Carol
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    This weekend's full Blood Moon is a supermoon on Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles) Empty This weekend's full Blood Moon is a supermoon on Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles)

    Post  Carol Thu Sep 24, 2015 12:45 am

    This weekend's full Blood Moon is a supermoon on Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles) PDT_strip2
    http://www.spaceweather.com
    The Blood Moon on Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles) on Sunday night 9/27-9/28 is considered a heavenly sign

    SUPERMOON ECLIPSE: This weekend's full Moon is a supermoon, the biggest and brightest full Moon of the year. And it is going to be eclipsed. On Sunday evening, Sept. 27th, the supermoon will pass through the shadow of Earth, turning the lunar disk a coppery shade of red.

    Sky watchers in the Americas, Europa, Africa, and eastern parts of Asia can see the event. The next total eclipse of the Moon won't come until January 31, 2018, so if you live in the eclipse zone, check it out.

    What makes the eclipsed Moon turn red? A quick trip to the Moon provides the answer: Imagine yourself standing on a dusty lunar plain looking up at the sky. Overhead hangs Earth, nightside down, completely hiding the sun behind it. The eclipse is underway.

    You might expect Earth seen in this way to be utterly dark, but it's not. The rim of the planet looks like it is on fire. As you scan your eye around Earth's circumference, you're seeing every sunrise and every sunset in the world, all of them, all at once. This incredible light beams into the heart of Earth's shadow, filling it with a coppery glow and transforming the Moon into a great red orb.

    Its source is ozone. Atmospheric scientist Richard Keen of the University of Colorado explains: "During a lunar eclipse, most of the light illuminating the moon passes through the stratosphere where it is reddened by scattering. However, light passing through the upper stratosphere penetrates the ozone layer, which absorbs red light and actually makes the passing light ray bluer." This can be seen, he says, as a soft blue fringe around the red core of Earth's shadow.

    To catch the turquoise on Sept. 27-28, he advises, "look during the first and last minutes of totality. The turquoise rim is best seen in binoculars or a small telescope."


    Click on the image, below, to view an animation of the eclipse and to find out when to look:
    http://www.spaceweather.com

    Final "Blood Moon" Will Appear Over SoCal Sunday
    http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Final-Blood-Moon-Will-Appear-Over-SoCal-Sunday-328771161.html


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol

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