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    4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Carol
    Carol
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    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty n4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:37 pm

    4 essential items for self-sustainability

    I personally consider the following items essential for
    self-sustainability and just ordered the 5th, a Kelly Kettle Kit.
    If we are going to be living in snow county this seems like an
    essential as well.

    1. Vitamins and Minerals @ www.swansonvitamins.com.
    They have really reasonable prices and I order a lot of Vitamin D3.
    Vitamin D will help us avoid the flu as it improves the immune system.

    2. Inexpensive Rare Heirloom vegetable seeds

    Non GMO and Hybrid seeds are full of nutrition... GMO and Hybrid are
    not and I've read some studies how GMO also alters the blood of those
    eating those food. Organic will become a very highly prized item to
    have and to eat.

    http://survivalistseeds.com/Home_Page.html

    http://www.patriotfood.com/

    5 Rare Heirloom Vegetable Varieties
    AND
    FREE- Patriot Gardening System How to DVD - $20 value
    AND
    FREE- Doomsday Water Filter How To DVD - $20 value

    6,000 All-Natural, Non-GMO, Non-Hybrid, Organic, Rare Heritage
    Vegetable Seeds. That's 4 Pounds! And they come inside a TIME CAPSULE.
    I probably should have bought several of these.

    Exclusive 100 year Time Capsule
    4 pounds of RARE heirloom seeds inside...
    25 Grow Anywhere RARE Heirloom Seed Varieties
    6,000 Heirloom Seeds
    Over 4 Pounds of Rare Heirloom Seeds
    Withstands 3 tons of weight
    Is rodent and waterproof
    Keeps seeds fresh for decades
    AND WE SHIP 3 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING YOUR ORDER
    FOR JUST: $119.95

    3. Solar Backup Generator

    http://www.mysolarbackup.com/
    Price is just $1597.00, plus only $95.00 shipping anywhere in the continental U.S.
    Solutions From Science
    Dept. Solar Backup
    815 W. Main St.
    P.O. Box 518
    Thomson, IL 61285

    877-327-0365

    4. Big Berkey gravity fed water filter


    We are on a catchment system but many get water with flouride or
    choline in it with is is not good for anyone's body. All of our
    drinking water is filtered.

    Elements will remove harmful pathogenic bacteria such as E-coli,
    Cholera Salmonella Typhi, Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The filters
    remove and reduce unwanted chemicals such as Chlorine, lead, rust,
    sediment, pesticides, herbicides, organic solvents, VOC’s, SOC’s,
    Trihalomethanes and foul tastes and odors. The durable and efficient
    Black Berkey elements can be cleaned and re-cleaned (up to 100 times or
    more) as needed with a soft brush or Scotch-Brite pad.
    http://www.redbarnworkshop.com/default.aspx?
    http://www.bigberkey.net/?gclid=CP3j...FRQpawodgzYAAQ

    Heres a list for those on a budget



    1. Water filter http://www.bwtechnologies.com/aquapure_traveller.html



    2. Kelly kettle http://www.kellykettle.com/

    http://www.redbarnworkshop.com/default.aspx?



    3. Tins of Beans



    4. a Lighter


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
    Admin

    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Thu Jul 15, 2010 10:26 pm

    Here is another good item.

    http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_ZK%20X115_A_name_E_Tote-able%20Toilet%E2%84%A2%20Seat%20&%20Lid

    Tote-able Toilet™ Seat & Lid






    More Sanitation and Hygiene >>
    More Sanitation >>



    This toilet lid gives you the ability to turn an ordinary
    bucket into a portable toilet anywhere. Giving you the comforts of home
    even in an emergency outdoors.
    Bucket sold separately.

    4 essential items for self-sustainability ZK-X115 http://beprepared.com


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
    Admin

    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Fri Jul 16, 2010 11:35 am

    This information is from Solutions From Science where I also purchased seeds and other items for off grid living.
    info@solutionsfromscience.com

    The Survival Pack: A Vital Part of "Plan B"

    When it comes to survival, you can focus so much on "Plan A" that "Plan
    B" is forgotten. Then disaster strikes and Plan B turns out to be just
    what you needed! Here's what I mean: You've done a good job of survival
    planning, and you've stockpiled all you need to sustain you for several
    months. But what happens when you're cut off from your stockpile
    through something natural, like fire or flood, or something potentially
    deadlier, like an organized gang looking for relief of their own?

    For the sake of your own safety (and your family's safety) you need to
    be ready to face dangers both natural and man-made. And beyond your own
    family, you can also serve to help others going through a similar
    situation (even those who ridiculed your priority of preparation; this
    is no time for "I told you so").

    There's no one-size-fits-all way to prepare for the unknown. Your
    response will depend on being ready for a number of scenarios. There's
    a time when survival means fighting it out - and a time when the only
    option is escape.

    You need an escape plan to help you get to a safer location or even
    completely out of dodge if needed. And when you go, you need a survival
    pack to sustain you at least for a week. It can take a while to list
    and gather the things you need, so I've given you a head start.

    1. The Pack to Keep It All In. Any sturdy, durable pack with enough
    room will do. Make sure it's camouflage, dark green, or another color
    that will help you remain undetected.

    2. Basic Sustenance. First, water. Get a canteen with cup, a water
    bottle, and of course, a water filter. Then, fire; add a supply of
    waterproof matches, a magnesium fire starter, and tinder. Then food to
    last you for at least a week. Think dry, think shelf life - some ideas
    are oatmeal, energy bars, and freeze-dried foods. Get a light weight
    mess kit to cook your meals, and a small stove such as the Peak-One
    backpackers stove.

    3. Setting up Camp. First, pack a sleeping bag, a potential life saver
    in cold weather. The best is a light weight "mummy" style, rated to -20
    degrees. Then some form of shelter like a compact tent, again in a
    color that readily blends with the environment. For injuries and
    illness, pack a first-aid kit tailored to your individual needs; of
    course, include a supply of your own personal meds. Complete this part
    of your preparation by including a source of light (as simple as a
    small LED flashlight and two sets of batteries) and some basic tools -
    a folding saw, Swiss Army knife, and a small shovel.

    4. Some Ideas for the Long Haul. So far, we've looked at the basics.
    Here are a few other things too add to your survival pack that may be
    useful for an emergency that lasts more than a few days.

    - A fishing kit and snare wire to multiply your chances of finding food when your supply runs out.

    - Small binoculars help you see game, as well as your enemy, before they see you.

    - Plastic bags (both big and small) are handy in a variety of ways, including keeping things dry.

    - Extra clothing - At least one extra pair of socks and underwear, other items if space permits.

    Other useful stuff - brainstorm a little if you have extra room. How
    about electrical tape, face paint, gloves, and a sharpening stone?

    5. Firearms. I've left this for last, because everyone with a heart for
    survival has their own idea of the best to bring along. Suffice it to
    say, your personal choice will be shaped by whatever gun you can see
    yourself carrying in an emergency situation; in other words, something
    you consider durable, dependable, and powerful enough to turn a worst
    case scenario into at least a level playing field.

    Having a survival pack ready to be grabbed at a moment's notice, and an
    escape route to follow, makes perfect sense. Don't wait too long to
    pack the things you'll need if you're cut off from your home and
    stockpile. And this may not be permanent. If you can put some distance
    between yourself and the threat, you may be able to launch a
    retaliatory strike from a more favorable position.

    What Should You Plant?

    As weird as it sounds, if you intend to plant a garden, it's really not
    too early to decide now what you're going to grow later this year. Even
    with all the snow, spring (and planting season) will be here before you
    know it. However, the best method for deciding what to plant is to
    begin with evaluating your dietary needs.

    A diet that has a low glycemic index is probably the healthiest. It
    helps you fight insulin resistance, allows you to feel more satisfied
    without wild food craving swings, decreases your risk of heart disease
    and Type 2 diabetes, and allows you to lose weight in a healthy
    fashion. Depending on your area and climate, consider the following
    vegetables:

    - Asparagus
    - Beans - green and waxed
    - Broccoli
    - Cabbage
    - Cucumbers
    - Eggplant (try some of the more exotic varieties for fun!)
    - Greens (mustard, turnip, spinach, etc.)
    - Okra
    - Onions
    - Squash (including zucchini)

    If you're looking for an alternative squash recipe (other than boiling it to death or deep frying it) consider this one:

    2 crookneck yellow squash or zucchini, diced
    1/2 yellow or red onion, diced (you can use more if you like onion!)
    1 egg, beaten









    __________________
    Aloha,
    thank you, do jeh, toda, arigato, merci, grazie, salamat po, gracias,
    tack, sukria, danke schoen, kiitos, dank u, mahalo nui loa

    4 essential items for self-sustainability PbucketImages to nourish the spirit: http://mistsofavalon.invisionplus.ne...&showtopic=198

    http://www.projectavalon.net/forum/showthread.php?t=20368


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
    Admin

    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Fri Jul 16, 2010 11:37 am

    Lasagna Gardening
    by Patricia Lanza


    Note: wet down each layer as you build the beds.

    1. Soak b&w newspapers in water, then overlap sections in a single
    layer directly on top of premarked sod area. This smothers the
    weeds/grass underneath.

    2. Then put a 4 inch layer of moistened peat moss over that

    3. A moist 4 inch layer of organic shredded green material

    4. Another 4 inch layer of moistened peat moss

    5. A 4 inch layer of moist compost or yard waste

    6. Repeat the peat moss/organic matter pattern until your bed is built up to at least 18-24 inches high.

    7. Finish with compost on top, then either let it break down for a few
    months for certain crops or plant seeds and transplants directly into
    the matrix by pushing aside layers and inserting.

    As the layers break down, the earthworms will be eating the sod and
    breaking up the newspapers, mixing the layers together. The final
    result is an organic, self-tilled soil that's rich and free of disease
    and weed seeds. It's so simple.

    As a bonus, no need to fertilize because the soil was already is rich
    in composting organic matter. Best of all, no soil-borne diseases!
    Truly, this style of gardening is an organic gardener's paradise.

    The Best Growing Medium for Seeds

    To provide the optimum growing conditions, and to avoid disease and
    insect problems, seeds should be started in a soilless growing mix, not
    in garden soil. A good soilless mix is a moist and spongy blend of
    sphagnum moss, vermiculite and perlite. The finer the texture the
    better.

    What is a "soilless growing medium"?

    Sphagnum moss is a dehydrated bog plant that is able to absorb 10 to 20
    times its weight in water. It is used to retain water and provide
    texture. Look for moss that has been "milled" to remove debris and
    achieve a fine consistency. Sphagnum moss is naturally acidic (pH 3.5),
    so if you are creating your own soil blend, you should add some
    limestone to counteract the acidity. Sphagnum moss also has some
    fungus-inhibiting properties.

    Vermiculite is mica rock that has been heated until it expands into
    what look like tiny multi-paged books. It is used to retain water and
    provide texture for strong root growth. Vermiculite is pH neutral,
    sterile and insoluble. It contains some magnesium and potassium, and
    also has a high cation exchange capacity, which means it is able to
    absorb fertilizers and release them to plant roots when needed.

    Perlite is made from crushed lava that has been heated until the
    particles "pop" into white, sponge-like kernels. It is used to retain
    water and provide good aeration. Perlite is sterile and pH neutral. It
    holds three to four times its weight in water.

    You can purchase a ready-mixed blend, or mix your own, using 1/3
    vermiculite, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 milled sphagnum moss. Remember that
    soilless mixes contain few, if any, nutrients. You will need to start
    feeding your seedlings with a weak fertilizer solution several weeks
    after they germinate, and continue to feed them weekly until you
    transplant them into the garden. Another option is Organic Seedstaring
    Mix, which is made up of sphagnum peat moss, perlite, compost, protein
    meal and trace minerals.

    After your seedlings are six to eight weeks old, you can transplant
    them into larger pots with a coarser growing medium, such as our
    Transplant Mix. If you wish, you can add up to 20 percent garden soil
    or sifted compost. A standard blend may contain 1/3 compost, 1/3
    perlite or vermiculite, and 1/3 sphagnum moss. This will help ensure
    that your plants have access to some soil nutrients, and it will also
    help prepare them for life in the garden.

    Planting and Caring for Your Seedlings
    http://www.gardeners.com/How-to-Star...efault,pg.html

    The growing medium should be thoroughly moistened before it is placed
    in your seedstarting containers (warm water works best). Fill the flats
    or containers to within 1/4 to 1/2 inch of the top. You are now ready
    to sow your seeds. But before you do so, take another look at the seed
    packet for any special information about pre-chilling, pre-soaking, a
    preference for light or darkness, or special temperature requirements.

    Seeds can either be scattered on the soil surface or placed
    individually into each growing cell. Resist the temptation to sow too
    thickly. Most seeds should be covered with a fine layer of soil. Unless
    the seeds require light to germinate (such as snapdragons), or are too
    tiny to tolerate being covered (such as petunias), you should cover the
    seeds to about three times their thickness.

    Gently moisten the growing medium (using a mister or with dribbles of
    water) to ensure good contact between the seeds and the soil. Label
    each flat, row, or container with a wood or plastic marker so you can
    identify them later. Save the seed packet for reference.

    Temperature: The temperatures for optimum germination listed on
    seed packets refer to soil temperature, not air temperature. Though
    some seeds germinate best at a soil temperature of 60 degrees F, and
    some at 85 degrees, most prefer a temperature of about 78 degrees.

    If the soil is too cold, seeds may take much longer to germinate, or
    they may not germinate at all. To provide additional warmth, you can
    place the containers on top of a warm refrigerator, television, or keep
    them in a warm room until the seeds germinate. Just be sure to get your
    seedlings to a sunny window or under lights within 24 hours of seeing
    little sprouts emerging through the soil surface.

    After germination, most seedlings grow best if the air temperature is
    below 70 degrees F. If temperatures are too warm (over 75), the
    seedlings will grow too fast and get weak and leggy. Most seedlings
    grow fine in air temperatures as low as 50 degrees, as long as soil
    temperature is maintained at about 65 to 70. For seedlings that
    germinate best in warm soil temperatures, try using a heat mat .

    Light: Most seeds don't require light to germinate, but as soon
    as they sprout, they need to be placed in a south-facing window or
    under special lights that are designed for growing plants. Check your
    seeds daily. Seeds that germinate and start to grow without adequate
    light will become tall and leggy—a condition that is almost impossible
    to correct.

    Most seedlings require 14 to 16 hours of direct light to manufacture
    enough food to produce healthy stems and leaves. The characteristic
    legginess that often occurs when seedlings are grown on a windowsill
    indicates that the plants are not receiving enough light intensity, or
    enough hours of light. If your seedlings are in a south-facing window,
    you can enhance the incoming light by covering a piece of cardboard
    with aluminum foil and placing it in back of the seedlings. The light
    will bounce off the foil and back onto the seedlings.
    SunLite Fixture
    SunLite bulbs are color-balanced to promote healthy growth and abundant blooms.

    If you do not have a south-facing window, you will need to use
    artificial lights. When growing seedlings under lights, you can use a
    combination of cool and warm fluorescents, or full-spectrum fluorescent
    bulbs. Familiar incandescent bulbs produce too much heat in relation to
    the light given off. They also lack the blue-spectrum light that keeps
    seedlings stocky and dark green.

    Seedlings need a high intensity of light. The fluorescent bulbs should
    be placed very close to the plants—no more than three inches away from
    the foliage—and should be left on 12 to 14 hours per day. If you are
    growing your seedlings on a windowsill, you may need to supplement with
    a few hours of artificial light, especially during the winter months.

    Moisture: Germination requires consistent moisture. It is
    important that the soil be kept moist but not soggy to prevent the
    seeds from rotting. There are different ways to achieve this. Some
    gardeners cover their flats with clear plastic until the seeds
    germinate. Many seedstarting systems have plastic covers to help retain
    moisture during this critical period.

    As soon as your seeds have sprouted, remove any plastic covering to
    reduce moisture and humidity levels. Check the soil every day to ensure
    that it is moist, not wet. Too much moisture will retard root growth
    and lead to disease problems. Letting the soil dry out a bit between
    waterings helps prevent molds and fungus from growing on the soil
    surface.

    Your seedlings will be much happier if you water them with
    room-temperature water rather than ice-cold tap water. If your water
    supply is chlorinated, fill some plastic jugs or your watering can and
    let the water sit overnight so the chlorine dissipates. Don't use water
    that has been through a water softener. The sodium may kill your
    seedlings. Try to make sure that the moisture reaches the bottom of the
    growing container so your seedlings will stretch their roots out and
    create a nice, fat rootball. You might want to fill the sink or a
    waterproof tray with an inch or two of water and set your containers
    right in the water. Just be sure to remove them from the water when the
    soil surface feels fully moist to the touch.

    Air and Humidity: Most seedlings like a humidity level of 50 to
    70 percent. Higher humidity levels and poor air circulation can lead to
    fungus growth on the soil surface and disease problems. If the air in
    your house is very dry, you can keep your seedlings happy by setting
    them on capillary matting, or in a waterproof tray filled with small
    stones or a humidity grid and a little water. If your plants are in a
    small room, you may consider running a small fan to keep the air
    circulating.

    Thinning and Potting Up: You may need to transplant your seedlings into
    larger pots if they start to get crowded and it's still too early to
    put them outdoors. Don't wait until the plants are a tangle of foliage
    and roots. The less you rip and tear, the better your plants will
    survive the move. When handling tiny seedlings, grasp them by their
    leaves or roots. Avoid holding them by their stems, which are fragile
    and can be easily crushed or bent.

    Stems and roots are easier to separate when the soil is dry rather than
    wet. You can remove a clump of seedlings and separate them as you go,
    or use a spoon or your fingers to remove individual plants. Most
    seedlings should be repotted at the same depth or just a little deeper.
    The exception is tomato seedlings. When transplanting tomatoes, you
    should remove all but the top few leaves, and bury the rest of the
    stem. New roots will form along whatever part of the stem is
    underground. When your seedlings have been repotted, water well,
    fertilize and return them to the grow light or sunny windowsill.

    Transplanting: Once the weather has warmed up, you can start
    "hardening off" your seedlings by gradually exposing them to the great
    outdoors. They have been pampered with warm temperatures, plenty of
    light and consistent water. The weather outside is not so
    kind—especially in the spring!

    At least one week before you plan to put your plants into the garden,
    begin reducing the amount of water and fertilizer you give them. Place
    your plants outdoors for one hour each day on a protected porch or
    under the shade of a tree. Gradually increase the amount of time they
    spend outdoors. Be sure to protect them from too much wind and hot sun.

    If at all possible, try to transplant your seedlings on an overcast or
    drizzly day when the wind is relatively calm. A polyethylene row cover
    or shade fabric can help ease the transition, and will protect your
    plants from cats, flea beetles and other threats as well. Be sure that
    you water well, so the roots establish good soil contact.
    What to Feed Your Seedlings

    Fertilizing: Once your seedlings develop their second set of
    true leaves, it is time to start feeding them. Young seedlings are very
    tender and can't tolerate a full dose of fertilizer. Baby them with a
    half-strength dose until they are three or four weeks old. After that,
    you should start full-strength fertilizing every week or two. Since
    your seedlings are growing in a sterile, soilless medium, fertilizing
    them is absolutely critical. For best results, use an organic
    fertilizer that contains trace elements to ensure that seedlings get
    all the major and minor nutrients.

    Seaweed/kelp extracts: Kelp's almost magical effect on plants
    has been well documented. It seems to be especially effective on
    seedlings, promoting vigor, cold hardiness, and pest and disease
    resistance. Apply a dilute amount to the soil or foliage several times
    during seedling development and at transplanting time. Kelp is not
    considered a fertilizer, because it does not provide any major
    nutrients. It should always be used in combination with a complete
    organic fertilizer.

    Fish emulsion: An excellent source of trace minerals, as well as
    micro- and macronutrients. It can be smelly, so be cautious about using
    it indoors.

    Complete fertilizers: These specially formulated blends contain
    plant nutrients and organic compounds that promote strong root growth
    and overall vigor. They ensure that your plants get off to a strong
    start by providing a balanced supply of micro- and macronutrients
    including the Big Three: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. We
    recommend Plant Health Care for Seedlings.









    __________________


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
    Admin

    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Fri Jul 16, 2010 11:39 am

    Companion Planting



    • Asparagus/Tomato, Parsley, Basil

    • Beans/Herbs, Vegetables

    • Cabbage/Aromatic Herbs, Celery, Beets, Onion Family, Chamomile, Spinach, Chard

    • Carrots/Peas, Lettuce, Onion, Sage, Tomato

    • Celery/ Nasturtium, Onion, Cabbage, Tomato

    • Cucumber/ Beans, Peas, Sunflower, Raddish

    • Lettuce/ Carrot, Radish, Strawberry, Cucumber

    • Onions/Beets, Carrot, Lettuce, Cabbage

    • Parsley/Tomato, Asparagus

    • Peas/Carrots, Raddish, Turnip, Cumcumber, Beans

    • Potato/Beans, Cabbage, Horseraddish, Marigolds

    • Raddish/Peas, Nasturtium, Lettuce, Cucumber

    • Spinach/Strawberry, Faba Bean

    • Tomato/Onion, Marigold, Asparagus, Carrot, Parsley, Cucumber

    • Turnip/Pea



    Companion planting improves the micro-organisms in the soil.







    __________________


    Underground root cellar would work and some of those instant heating packs.



    Here is info on various water filtration systems.



    http://www.911water.com/



    4 essential items for self-sustainability Pfwb

    I like the portable ones for backpacks and they're inexpensive. $27-34

    Underground root cellar would work and some of those instant heating packs.



    Body warmers are here: http://www.amazon.com/Grabber-Adhesi.../dp/B001G7QEDI

    Water Filter
    Video here http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/mi...er_filter.html


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
    Admin

    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:05 pm

    PA Preperation and Advice Links

    http://www.projectavalon.net/forum/forumdisplay.php?s=&daysprune=&f=50








    Dr Ken Street - Seed Hunter










    Genevieve








    Oil Extraction for Seeds and Nuts










    Carol








    What will you Choose ?










    BeaTnik-BandiT








    The wild food yearbook










    Swanny








    Preparation for the possible collapse, in stages










    feynman








    Skills to help survival
    (4 essential items for self-sustainability Multipage 1 2 )









    Donny








    Off the Grid Day










    Mizar








    Ham Radio Operators?










    Gardavkra








    Meet Others of Like Mind & Interests










    Nenuphar








    The Survival Learnings & Techniques of Ray Mears !










    St@rlightener














    How to shield your electronics.
    (4 essential items for self-sustainability Multipage 1 2 3 )









    Steven














    Nature was my Teacher










    Leadman








    The One Hundred Items To Disappear Off The Shelves First










    Carol








    How To Be Prepared










    Waterman

    Books for your permanent library -- free
    (4 essential items for self-sustainability Multipage 1 2 )







    Shechaiyah








    Preparing ones body/mind for changes - list of things to do (inc cold showers!)
    Anchor

    On War, Gardening, and Cooking for Bad Times, by Elizabeth B.
    Baggywrinkle

    On War, Gardening, and Cooking for Bad Times, by Elizabeth B.
    Baggywrinkle

    12 Volt Power
    reggaeman

    Start Stocking Food
    (4 essential items for self-sustainability Multipage 1 2 )
    jpvskyfreak

    Coleman Fuel is WHITE GAS (UNLEADED
    http://www.projectavalon.net/forum/showthread.php?t=6638

    Castor oil plant
    Carol

    A Measure of Your Food Self-sufficiency
    Baggywrinkle

    The Foundation of Basic Preparedness, by Doc Gary
    Baggywrinkle

    Refrigeration without electricity; zeer pots
    Baggywrinkle

    Root cellars thrive as food prices rise
    Baggywrinkle

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    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
    Carol
    Carol
    Admin
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    Posts : 25028
    Join date : 2010-04-07
    Location : Hawaii

    4 essential items for self-sustainability Empty Re: 4 essential items for self-sustainability

    Post  Carol on Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:13 pm

    One
    of the main tools that everyone should have is a good peeler. Along
    with a good knife and a can opener, it is one of the most valuable
    tools you can have in your kitchen. How else are you going to peel all
    those vegetables from the garden without a lot of waste?

    There are three main varieties of potato or vegetable peeler.

    1.) The first one is the Yorkshire type peeler ( It is also sometimes
    known as a Lancashire type peeler). This is a design that has a blade
    as an extension of a handle, in a manner similar to the way a blade is
    attached to a knife. It is probably the most common type.

    2.) The second one is called a Y-peeler. This is due to its shape. The
    blade is usually perpendicular to the handle in this type. This is
    similar to a razor and they are sometimes called the razor type peeler.

    3.) The third one has no official name but is sometimes referred to as
    an “Aussie type peeler”. It is used fairly extensively in Australia,
    where this particular peeler design originated. It was designed in
    about 1947 by a company called Dalsonware in Melbourne who call it the
    "Dalson Classic Aussie Peeler". It consists of a plastic handle which
    extends upwards to support both the base and tip of a partially
    rotating blade. This type of peeler is also typical of the general
    fruit and vegetable peeler that is used in Canada.

    Many peelers have an 'eye gouger' beside the blade. This is a loop of
    metal used to dig out eyes and blemishes from the potato. They are also
    great for peeling sweet potatoes for your Thanksgiving dinner!

    Mrs. RW has one of the “Aussie type peelers” and loves to peel
    potatoes, cucmbers and carrots with it. “Aussie type peelers” - This is
    a good thing!
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    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol

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